New Year: Making our Resolutions Count

Jan 07, 2019

A typical New Year celebration: such celebrations must transmute from physical displays to firm resolve to improve our lives and immediate environment

It is a brand New Year. The moment the hand of the clock struck midnight last Tuesday, people all over the world erupted in celebrations. The mode of the celebrations differed among individuals. While some set up bonfires and released firecrackers, others went partying. Yet there were those who stayed in their homes with their families to usher in the New Year with prayers, while some, especially in Nigeria, attended what they call ''Cross Over Night''. No matter how the New Year was celebrated, the central theme was the expectation by all that the New Year would bring better tidings.

Usually in this period, people come up with resolutions on how they intend to live their lives as different from the previous year. This is known as New Year Resolutions. The essence of such resolutions is to bring about positive changes in lifestyle and in inter-personal relationships.

One would therefore expect that such resolutions would impact positively on society, making our world a better place to live in. But, alas, such has hardly been the case.

Despite the seeming firm resolve by people to lead new lives, the trader in the market will still cheat unsuspecting buyers at the slightest opportunity; the civil servant will still expect gratification before treating the files of people; the apprentice will still pilfer money from the savings of their master; the lecturer will still engage in sex/money for marks ; the pastor will still place materialism above salvation of souls; the worker will still retain the habit of coming late; the politician will still use public money for private interests and society will generally remain as bad as it has ever been.

What it means is that resolutions are made by people for the sake of making them, while they continue living their lives as usual. Perhaps, they do not appreciate the meaning of such resolutions, or they simply do not care.

Whatever the case, however, it would be good and beneficial to society if people knew what resolutions mean. Those who make such resolutions should endeavour to keep them and apply what they resolved to the letter.

 

This New Year therefore offers yet another opportunity for Nigerians to live true to their resolutions, no matter the distractions or frustrations they may face. Refusing to budge will only serve to strengthen us as a nation, especially this election year.

We should all resolve to elect better leaders who can salvage the country from the precipice of anarchy. We should resolve not to be bought over by politicians but to stand firm and for the first time vote according to our conscience, regardless of party affiliation. We should resolve to vote only for good and capable people, no matter their parties. That is the only way for Nigeria to grow beyond the ethnic and religious sentiments that usually characterize elections in the country.

Indeed, making our resolutions count this time around is not negotiable if at all we hope to develop individually and collectively.

May the year 2019 be a blessing to each and every one of us and to Nigeria in Jesus Name!


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